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Thread: F1 2018

  1. #151
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    They need to ban racing at tracks where they test all off season at (barca).

  2. #152
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    Testing or not, track has been impossible to pass on for the most.
    a n t i l a g . c o m

  3. #153
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    http://syriamsa.com/english/motor-ra...on-of-victory/



    lol... this gets better... the worldwide conspiro
    team sports can go to hell. I'm never going to rely on some weak minded [email protected]#$ to help me win a game. Ill win it myself. George Leeman.

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  5. #154
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  7. #155
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    From autosport plus

    During the Honda years, everyone at McLaren seemed to believe that all of its problems were down to the engine and that once it had changed to Renault things would be different.

    But it was clear from 2015-17 that there were also problems on the chassis side, and now the engine change has been made it's become very obvious some shortcomings remain.

    Some asked why I was so critical of McLaren during the Honda period, and those clear shortcomings were the reason - after all, it's a team I worked for during my career so I want to see it perform as it should.

    The car is a better package than it was, but again McLaren has its problems and is still not as quick as it should be on the straights.

    You have to ask if it is making a mistake in not balancing up the demands of the chassis with that of the engine.

    This raises some questions about the decision making and the objectives set technically, because there is nowhere to hide when running the same engine package as Red Bull and the Renault works team. And it is clear that the start of this season has led McLaren to take a long, hard look at itself.

    Zak Brown, who recently became the F1 team's CEO, talks about the need for accountability in the technical department. Sorting this can't fail to improve its development path, and if there wasn't already accountability in all departments then the company is not very well-run.



    McLaren has long since believed that a 'flat' structure, with Tim Goss (recently departed as part of a restructure), Peter Prodromou and Matt Morris at the top, is better than a pyramid structure. But that will never work.

    You do need someone to steer the ship, to be accountable and to ensure all the resources - both financial and people - are used to the maximum. And they need to be strong enough to make the decisions that ensure the company has that direction. More importantly, they need to be strong enough to hold up their hands if they are going in the wrong direction and the development path needs to be altered.

    It's positive that McLaren seems to be moving in this direction, even if it has taken too long. But getting a new structure in place is no easy task. There are few people out there with the vision, the skills and the experience to qualify as a technical director or a chief technical officer.

    Yes, there are new people coming up who might be able to do that, but McLaren cannot afford to take a risk on an unknown in the situation it is in.

    If there wasn't already accountability in all departments then the company is not very well-run
    This means it could take a while to get the right person in, which is a problem given McLaren still wants to close on the frontrunners even while going through this.

    Another thing that is holding back McLaren is that its equipment is not quite as state of the art as it was a decade ago.

    The McLaren Technology Centre was built around its windtunnnel, which is now a bit outdated. That's why McLaren uses the Toyota Motorsport windtunnel in Germany.

    The current F1 cars have very high levels of downforce, and with the outwash front wing endplates it's vital that the windtunnel's internal cross section is big enough not to influence the airflow. Trying to make small developments of these components that are trying to influence the airflow outside of the tyres will be impossible if the windtunnel isn't right in this aspect.



    The driver-in-the-loop simulator is good, but it's just not as cutting edge as some of its rivals even though McLaren was once the pioneer in this area. These things can lead you down the wrong path very easily.

    McLaren is fortunate in that it has some very wealthy shareholders, but they didn't get rich by not knowing how to look after their cash. Their pockets are only so deep, so business plans must be in place to show there is a road to recovery, otherwise enthusiasm may just diminish - especially given the financial implications of the split with Honda and taking on Renault engines.

    With a major change in the technical regulations due for 2021, perhaps it does make sense for McLaren to prioritise investing time into getting its structure in place in preparation for that challenge. Given the aerodynamic rules are being modified a little next year in an attempt to improve overtaking, the team of people researching that change needs to be in place very soon.

    But you don't create and hone a new car out of a block of modelling foam, you start from a concept and that concept needs to have the development potential built into it and the confidence that research time will bring rewards in terms of lap time.

    McLaren is not the ground-breaking, standard-setting team it once was. It has to be considered just another team and it has no God-given right to success. You have to work on it, and take a few punches on the chin. But most teams go through this kind of challenge at one time or another and it's how you handle those blows that makes the difference. Every punch cannot force you to change how you work, or else you will never get up there.



    Change for change's sake is not positive. It's like a dam with a hole in it - you don't knock it down completely and start again because your new one will probably have a hole somewhere else. So it's about plugging the holes until you fix the leak, that way you will move forward.

    It's positive that McLaren has realised there were weaknesses beyond Honda and that it is addressing them. What matters now is that the decisions made on the technical structure are the right ones. If they are, then McLaren can start making progress towards the front again. If not, it could end up going round in circles.

    The problem started earlier than the Honda years, and a look back to the years since McLaren's last championship success with Lewis Hamilton in 2008 tracks that decline.

    McLaren has shown over the years it is not very good with new, up and coming drivers. It's not a team to go to to learn your trade
    Below, I've taken the team's constructors' championship position and, to compensate for the fact the points system changed, presented points scored as a percentage of the maximum. So, if McLaren had finished one-two in every race, that would be a 100% points score.

    In 1988, McLaren won 15 out of 16 races, with a points return of 78%. A decade later, in 1998, it won nine out of 16 races with a points return of 61%. That shows how dominant the team was at times during the Ron Dennis era. But during those two particular seasons, it had great individual technical leadership in Gordon Murray and then Adrian Newey. The stats for the last decade are very different.

    2008
    2nd in constructors' championship
    Points: 47%

    This was not a bad season, with Hamilton winning the drivers' championship (just) and McLaren second in the constructors' championship. The team was very driven at this point and didn't hang around on making decisions, such as replacing Fernando Alonso - who should have been its championship shot in 2007 had new boy Hamilton not turned up and shocked them all.



    2009
    3rd in constructors' championship
    Points: 23%

    McLaren missed the boat with the comprehensive aerodynamic rule change of 2009. Yes, the double diffuser introduced by Brawn, Williams and Toyota at the start of the season compounded its problems, but there were lots of other details McLaren missed. This showed that even then there wasn't anyone forward-thinking enough in the technical department.

    During this period, McLaren earned the handle of being one of the best teams at in-season development. That's a positive, but it is all relative to the start point. If it is near the front of the field, then that development will take you right into the mix. If not, no matter how good you are at improving, you are playing catch-up.

    2010
    2nd in constructors' championship
    Points: 56%

    A good driver line-up - as Heikki Kovalainen was replaced by Jenson Button to create a pairing of the last two world champions - showed McLaren's true vision for success and it paid off on many occasions in 2010.

    It battled hard with Red Bull, which was coming of age under Newey's technical leadership. But the absence of a Newey of its own meant McLaren had to go in a different direction with its technical organisation.

    This explains the flat technical structure, with everyone having to justify everything to everyone else in that arrangement as opposed to having someone like Newey at the very top, steering the ship.

    2011
    2nd in constructors' championship
    Points: 61%

    Again, a decent year with the same strong driver line-up. McLaren held onto second in the championship and increased its points percentage, but the Red Bull domination was in full swing so there was not a lot that could be done to stop that.



    Still there were problems. Remember, this was the year when McLaren ran the 'octopus' exhaust pre-season and struggled badly with reliability before the executive decision was made to scrap it for one based on Red Bull's concept. This worked well, although it was a case of having to make a change to correct a mistake.

    2012
    3rd in constructors' championship
    Points: 44%

    McLaren could have won the championship in 2012, but things had started to drop away, with far too many mistakes being made by the trackside team.

    One of the biggest mistakes was letting Hamilton get away at the end of the season, a decision that followed him losing victory in Singapore to a gearbox problem.

    Love him or hate him, he's a very quick driver who can drive a car with a variation of balances, meaning the set-up is not critical. Yes, to get to his ultimate level everything has to be right, but that ability to dig deep and get the results is crucial for keeping motivation in a team.

    2013
    5th in constructors' championship
    Points: 15%

    Replacing Hamilton with Sergio Perez was always going to be a gamble and on occasions he rose to the challenge. But the car was not good enough and it was around this time that there started to be a bit of a breakdown in the internal management.

    Dennis and Martin Whitmarsh seemed to be wanting to head in different directions and when that happens you need to nail your flag to one mast or the other.

    Perez also suffered from this internal implosion, and as McLaren has shown over the years it is not very good with new up and coming drivers. Its forte is the hardened professional and it's not a team to go to to learn your trade - unless perhaps you are a driver of Hamilton's level.



    2014
    5th in constructors' championship
    Points: 22%

    The first year of the hybrid engines and McLaren's last year using the Mercedes power unit. This wasn't a good year for McLaren. Williams - as a customer using the same Mercedes engine - finished third in the constructors' championship, with the other customer, Force India, not far behind McLaren.

    Much more was expected of McLaren and it was clear there were still some technical limitations heading into the Honda era, even though moves were made behind the scenes to address this.

    2015
    9th in constructors' championship
    Points: 3%

    McLaren rightly felt that to take on the big boys it needed to become a fully-fledged works team again. The only way to do that was to part company with Mercedes, and on paper Honda made a lot of sense.

    It was a tough 2015, but it was a season of investment in the new relationship. During that season I never really got the impression that McLaren realised how much of a disadvantage it had given Honda with its 'size zero' aero treatment.

    Basically, when an engine company is coming into a formula with such a complicated power unit package you need to give it room to manoeuvre and the packaging restrictions that McLaren imposed meant Honda's hands were tied.

    Because of this, I don't think that McLaren or Honda really took their problems by the scruff of the neck and they both hoped that normal developments would overcome them.

    2016
    6th constructors' championship
    Points: 8%

    Progress was made as the season went on, but still McLaren felt it was a long way behind on the power unit front. Instead of just knuckling down and getting on with it, it seemed to adopt an attitude of embarrassing Honda on any occasion possible.



    Alonso sitting on a deck chair in Brazil after a problem with his power unit really would not have gone down well with the powers that be in Japan. To get the message across to the Japanese it needs to be done factually and behind closed doors. Again, I never saw the management style that I felt would achieve that - the problems weren't all down to Honda.

    McLaren had a variety of problems of its own and I also don't think it ran the car with the optimum set-up for what was obviously a slightly down-on-power engine. Instead, it was always talking about how it had such a great chassis.

    Well, I'm not surprised McLaren thought that. Running extra downforce and with lower torque outputs than others meant that the car was quick in corners but bog slow down the straights.

    2017
    9th in constructors' championship
    Points: 3%

    McLaren thought this would be the year when the McLaren-Honda package would take a step forward, but it didn't. If anything, both reliability and performance went backwards.

    The change from Button to Stoffel Vandoorne didn't help - Vandoorne was another new kid on the block thrown in at the deep end and he lost his confidence. By mid-season he was back on the pace, but still he had no real reference for what a good package should be like. Everything was in Alonso's hands and again he felt abusing Honda was the best way forward.

    McLaren lost confidence in Honda as early as pre-season testing, and began focusing on finding a way out of the agreement with Honda. That was achieved late in the season with a switch to Renault for 2018.

    So, three years' investment in building a relationship to potentially put McLaren on a footing that would allow it to take on the works teams of Mercedes and Ferrari went down the pan.

    Honda has to take on some of the responsibility for these three years of frustration, but McLaren is not without blame as well. McLaren never really joined the club of working with a company that was struggling to catch up with the pacesetters and seemed to adopt a blame culture - always pointing the finger at Honda.

    This year, McLaren is fifth in the constructors' championship at present, with 19% of the available points. It's an improvement, but there's a long way to go to get near the big three teams.

    And, as our look at the previous 10 years proves, there are plenty of problems still to be solved before McLaren can deliver on that objective.
    a n t i l a g . c o m

  8. #156
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    Monaco


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  10. #157
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    Thoroughly entertaining quali session

  11. #158
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    Nobody posted about Dan winning?

    Jesus, burn the servers, it's all over.
    a n t i l a g . c o m

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  13. #159
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    And Will Power won the Indy 500!
    Great weekend of international Aussie success at season highlight events!
    Quote Originally Posted by Phyber View Post
    Might be repost? Few fingers in asses lately

  14. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJ View Post
    Nobody posted about Dan winning?

    Jesus, burn the servers, it's all over.
    given up syria MSA
    team sports can go to hell. I'm never going to rely on some weak minded [email protected]#$ to help me win a game. Ill win it myself. George Leeman.

  15. #161
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    Monaco has always been shit for overtaking but that Dan can win with 160hp of MGU-K missing (20km/h slower on the main straight) and basically no rear brakes tells you something.

    Just wish they would put something over the team radio's that wasn't either Stroll or Hamilton sooking.

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  17. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmanvan View Post
    given up syria MSA
    http://syriamsa.com/wp-content/themes/site.php redirects every 3 seconds... the fuck?

  18. #163
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    gg been hapening for 3 weeks now.... ZFG apparently..... .... you have to copy paste any thing or put some text in quick reply window... that doesn't always work ....
    team sports can go to hell. I'm never going to rely on some weak minded [email protected]#$ to help me win a game. Ill win it myself. George Leeman.

  19. #164
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    possible to migrate everything to another forum/website, clean cut with no adds and bullshit rules?

  20. #165
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    Tried to post about Dans win - Syria MSA overlord says NO..

    The once mighty ANTILAG has fallen.....

  21. #166
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    Red Bull to Honda next year.....
    a n t i l a g . c o m

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  23. #167
    Quote Originally Posted by dmanvan View Post
    gg been hapening for 3 weeks now.... ZFG apparently..... .... you have to copy paste any thing or put some text in quick reply window... that doesn't always work ....
    Not ZFG, just not a simple fix. It's being worked on and will be resolved shortly.
    [ALM] X5M Daily
    Empire Performance - Mitsubishi Evo 6 Tarmac Rally Car.

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